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Shining Fame Performance recital will take place Thursday, Friday

WORTHINGTON -- More than a hundred dancers from Shining Fame Performance (SFP) will show off their best dance moves at their spring recital Thursday and Friday night at Memorial Auditorium Performing Arts Center.

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Dancers acknowledge the crowd at the conclusion of the Shining Fame Performance 2016 spring recital. (Special to the Daily Globe)

WORTHINGTON - More than a hundred dancers from Shining Fame Performance (SFP) will show off their best dance moves at their spring recital Thursday and Friday night at Memorial Auditorium Performing Arts Center.

 

Robyn Murphy, owner and instructor at SFP, said the recital is one of the studio’s biggest events, where students from all ages are able to showcase the choreography they’ve been practicing together since September.

 

“It’s really nice for the girls and boys to be able to show what they’ve been working on all year,” Murphy said. “It gives them a reason to go to class every week and learn their routines.”

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Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. with the show starting at 7 p.m. The event is free to the public, with the option to give a donation.

 

Students ranging from the youngest to the oldest dancers will be performing jazz, hip-hop, ballet, tap, contemporary and pointe routines. Murphy explained that the event hasn’t changed much from previous years, and noted that the choreography this year is more challenging.

 

“All the dancers have gotten better and the dances have gotten better, so it’s exciting because each year their routines are harder and more intricate,” she said. “They’re able to do more things, so it makes it more exciting each year to watch them.”

 

Although students are not being judged on their technique at the show, Murphy said it can be even more pressure for the dancers to perform in front of their families.   

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“When you have a recital there are quite a lot of people who don’t understand dance, so you have to make sure you give them a very good show,” said Murphy, adding that her students have been working on the performance for the last couple of weeks. “They’re not going to appreciate the little technique things … but they’re going to appreciate a good performance.”

 

Students who have been part of SFP for five years are going to be awarded with a medal at the conclusion of Thursday’s performance. Likewise, on Friday, students who have been dancing from one to 10 years will receive trophies.

 

“It gives them a milestone,” she said. “It’s  like all these years of hard work … they deserve to be recognized because it takes a lot of commitment.”

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