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State reaches plea deal with subject involved in WPD’s historic drug bust

WORTHINGTON -- An Onamia man that was the subject of the Worthington Police Department's largest drug seizure in department history last March reached a plea agreement Tuesday with the state related to the discovery of 482 pounds of marijuana and...

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Ivy

WORTHINGTON - An Onamia man that was the subject of the Worthington Police Department’s largest drug seizure in department history last March reached a plea agreement Tuesday with the state related to the discovery of 482 pounds of marijuana and packaging within Worthington city limits.

Luvar C. Ivy, 38, pleaded guilty to an amended second-degree possession of 25 kilograms or more of marijuana mixture charge, a felony. The marijuana was discovered in garbage bags in a rental van he was driving.

If sentenced in accordance to the plea agreement, Ivy would receive a four-year prison sentence, which would be stayed pending his compliance with terms of probation. All other terms, including a suspected county jail sentence, would be left up to the court and argued at sentencing, which will likely be scheduled 30 to 45 days from Tuesday’s plea hearing.

During his plea, Ivy did not deny knowing marijuana was in the vehicle he was driving, but claimed that he did not own the marijuana, didn’t rent the vehicle and ultimately did not know the drug’s final destination.

“Someone else was directing you where to go,” Ivy’s attorney Robert Plesha said, to which Ivy affirmed.

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Fifth Judicial District Judge Gordon Moore deferred acceptance or rejection of Ivy’s plea pending completion of a pre-sentence investigation, chemical use assessment and Minnesota sentencing guidelines worksheet.

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