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Street Work continuing in city

WORTHINGTON -- Street construction remains ongoing across various locations in Worthington, according to a press release from the city's engineering department issued Thursday.

WORTHINGTON - Street construction remains ongoing across various locations in Worthington, according to a press release from the city’s engineering department issued Thursday.

Work is continuing on concrete pavement and sidewalk ramps on Fifth Avenue between 12th and Miller streets. Sidewalk ramp work is now completed at 13th Street, and pavement and sidewalk ramp work is continuing near the 14th Street and Miller Street intersections.

Rose Avenue concrete surface restoration work is also continuing from Clary Street through Dover Street. Concrete sidewalk, driveway and pavement restoration is completed. Remaining work includes seven days for concrete hardening and spots of bituminous overlay placement. Turf restoration also remains to be undertaken.

Street reconstruction with sidewalk and trail is continuing on McMillan Street from Ryan’s Road to south of Stower Drive. Additionally, water main reconstruction efforts remain in progress on Elmwood Avenue between West Clary Street and Liberty Drive. Pipe testing and disinfecting work began Tuesday, and house water work is now scheduled to begin during the week of July 24.

Concrete driveway and pavement restoration work began Tuesday at James Boulevard and Nobles Street. Work also began Wednesday at Lake Street sidewalk crossings at Third Avenue, Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue.

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