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Suicide prevention text services expand statewide

ST. PAUL -- Minnesotans can now access suicide prevention and mental health crisis texting services 24 hours a day, seven days a week. As of April 1, people who text MN to 741741 will be connected with a trained counselor who will help defuse the...

ST. PAUL - Minnesotans can now access suicide prevention and mental health crisis texting services 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

As of April 1, people who text MN to 741741 will be connected with a trained counselor who will help defuse the crisis and connect the texter to local resources. The service helps people contemplating suicide and facing mental health issues.

Minnesota has had text suicide prevention services since 2011, but they have only been available in 54 of 87 counties, plus tribal nations. Crisis Text Line will offer suicide prevention and education efforts in all Minnesota counties and tribal nations, including, for the first time, the Twin Cities metro area.

Crisis Text Line is the state’s sole provider for this service as of April 1.

Crisis counselors undergo a 30-hour training program. Supervisors are mental health professionals with either master’s degrees or extensive experience in the field of suicide prevention.

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The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 also provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, as well as prevention and crisis resources.

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