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Missing Barbara Cotton, what we've learned in a year: Listen to episode 20

In this episode of Dakota Spotlight's A Better Search for Barbara we speak with Barb's childhood friend, Sandee Evanson.

Barbara_Cotton_Kathy_Cotton_1978.jpg
Barbara Cotton, left, and her sister Kathy in 1978, three years before Barbara vanished.
Contributed / Family of Barbara Cotton

Fifteen-year-old Barbara Cotton vanished without a trace from Williston, ND in 1981.

In this episode of Dakota Spotlight's A Better Search for Barbara we speak with Barb's childhood friend, Sandee Evanson. What have we learned over the last year since Dakota Spotlight began looking into this cold case? Sandee shares her thoughts on the ups and downs, the successes and the frustrations.

Also in this episode a conversation in California with family members of Stacey DeMarr Werder, a person of interest in this cold case.

LISTEN TO EPISODE 20 - A Lost Suicide Note

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'Clinker' found on the engine block of Michele 'Shelly' Julson's abandoned car in 1994 may be linked to an early sighting in rural Burleigh County, North Dakota, the Dakota Spotlight true crime podcast reports.

James Wolner is a Digital Content Producer at Forum Communications Company, Fargo North Dakota and the creator, producer and host of Dakota Spotlight, a true crime podcast. He has lived the Upper Midwest since 2013 and studied photojournalism at California State University at Fresno. He is fluent in English and Swedish.
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