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Thrivent Financial workshop earns financial literacy award

MINNEAPOLIS --Thrivent Financial recently received an Excellence in Financial Literacy Education (EIFLE) award for its From Me to We workshop. The awards, given by the Institute for Financial Literacy, honor individuals and organizations for thei...

MINNEAPOLIS -Thrivent Financial recently received an Excellence in Financial Literacy Education (EIFLE) award for its From Me to We workshop.
The awards, given by the Institute for Financial Literacy, honor individuals and organizations for their efforts to enhance financial literacy education among Americans in all walks of life. Thrivent took top honors in the “Adult Education Program of the Year” category.
“We are pleased to be honored with this award,” said Jan Elsasser, a director of Membership Engagement at Thrivent. “There are millions of Christians in the country that need help improving their financial well-being, and we are well placed to be the organization that helps them get where they want to be.”
Thrivent’s From Me to We Workshop helps couples, individually and together, identify values, understand childhood experiences, create SMART (specific, measureable, achievable, realistic and timed) goals and develop a balanced spending plan to build their financial future together.
The EIFLE Awards acknowledge innovation and quality of financial literacy education efforts and the commitment of those that offer them. This is the eighth time Thrivent has been honored for its financial education efforts by the Institute for Financial Literacy.
The Institute for Financial Literacy is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization whose mission is to make effective financial literacy education available to everyone. The organization is a national authority on adult financial education.
Individuals can learn more about Thrivent’s event and workshops at Thrivent.com/findaworkshop.

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