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Touch of Rust to take stage at 3 p.m. Saturday

WORTHINGTON -- The 18th Annual Worthington Windsurfing Regatta and Music Festival will take residents back to the classic rock era with the performance of Touch of Rust at 3 p.m. June 10.

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WORTHINGTON - The 18th Annual Worthington Windsurfing Regatta and Music Festival will take residents back to the classic rock era with the performance of Touch of Rust at 3 p.m. June 10.

 

The Minneapolis-based cover band started in 2009 with Todd Hamann and Mike Smeed, who are both guitarists. They wanted to share their passion for classic rock and desire to jam, so they brought together talented individuals and created Touch of Rust.

 

Touch of Rust lead singer Andrew Duszynski said the band is excited to come to Worthington for the first time and share the stage with recognized singers.

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“We are very happy to be part of it,” he said. “We checked out some of the information about the Regatta, and it looks like is going to be a pretty cool event.”

 

Touch of Rust is now a six-member band that brings back to life groups such as Creedence Clearwater Revival, Sublime and the Doobie Brothers.

 

Duszynski added that the energy from fans singing along some of the best classic rock songs is an experience that’s hard to put into words. A member of the group for three years, he said being part of a cover band is a completely different experience from other musical ensembles.

 

“The songs that we play have stood the test of time,”  Duszynski said. “Those songs will always be classics that will never go away.”

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Duszynski said Touch of Rust’s music appeals not only to a wide range of people, but the group also has band members of all ages that attract different generations of fans.

 

“We have pretty good stage presence and our demographic is what sets us apart - not only who comes to see our shows, but the band itself,” he said. “Our youngest member is 26 and the oldest is 62, so it’s going to grab folks from very different walks of life and age brackets.”

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