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Trump, Clinton in now dead heat, poll shows

WASHINGTON -- Republican Donald Trump pulled even with Democratic rival Hillary Clinton in a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released Wednesday, in a dramatic early sign that the Nov. 8 presidential election might be more hotly contested than first th...

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Candidates Hillary Clinton (left) and Donald Trump are now nearly tied in polls for the presidential election. Reuters

WASHINGTON - Republican Donald Trump pulled even with Democratic rival Hillary Clinton in a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released Wednesday, in a dramatic early sign that the Nov. 8 presidential election might be more hotly contested than first thought.
After weeks of trailing Clinton in head-to-head polls, the billionaire businessman’s numbers jumped after he effectively won the Republican nomination last week when his two remaining rivals quit, according to the online survey.
The national poll found 41 percent of likely voters supporting Clinton and 40 percent backing Trump, with 19 percent undecided. The survey of 1,289 people was conducted over five days and has a credibility interval of 3 percentage points.
The narrowing poll numbers are the result of both a gain by Trump and a drop by Clinton as she tries to overcome Democratic rival Sen. Bernie Sanders.
While the general election campaign has hardly begun, the poll does mark a shift toward Trump. A similar Reuters/Ipsos survey conducted in the five days to May 4 showed the former secretary of state at 48 percent and the New York magnate at 35 percent.
With the party’s primary seasons winding down, the two likely nominees have turned their attention to the Nov. 8 election and begun to test drive attacks - both on policy and personality - that will dominate the election for the coming months.
Clinton and Trump both poll well with voters of their respective parties, but independent voters continue to express uncertainty about who they will support, with 38 percent saying they are unsure or would vote for someone else.
But polls aside, one of the biggest factors in the race will be the changing demographics of the country as more minorities register to vote. Increased registration by Hispanics, who are likely to vote for Clinton, could play a roll in tipping the election her direction.
“This is an election that will be determined as much by the demographic composition of the American electorate as anything else - and that didn’t change in a week,” said University of Virginia political science professor Larry Sabato.
Clinton’s loss in the Democratic primary election in West Virginia Tuesday signaled possible trouble for her in industrial states in November.
Trump, 69, has taunted Clinton in recent days, saying she “can’t close the deal” against primary opponent Sanders.

Related Topics: CLINTON
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