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Two Worthington men charged in counterfeit incident

WORTHINGTON -- Brandon Limlee Thavixay, 20, and Inta Mikie Vongsynha, 19, both of Worthington, will have initial appearances in Nobles County District Court next week to answer to a charge of theft by swindle, a felony, after an alleged incident ...

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Thaxivay

WORTHINGTON - Brandon Limlee Thavixay, 20, and Inta Mikie Vongsynha, 19, both of Worthington, will have initial appearances in Nobles County District Court next week to answer to a charge of theft by swindle, a felony, after an alleged incident at a local retailer. Thavixay is also charged with counterfeiting of currency, also a felony.
According to court documents, earlier this month, an Asian man, later identified as Thavixay, purchased a 55-inch UHD television for $1,071.60 using 52 counterfeit $20 bills. After leaving the store with his purchase, a second Asian man - later identified as Vongsynha - returned the television minutes after its purchase to receive a refund on the item, stating he’d purchased the wrong television. He received a cash refund for the television. A review of surveillance footage showed Thavixay and Vongsynha leaving together after returning the merchandise.
A few days after the alleged incident, officers located both men and arrested them on the charge. Thavixay had four grams of marijuana in his possession during his arrest, which resulted in an additional petty misdemeanor charge for possessing a small amount of the drug.
Both men agreed to speak to police following their arrest. Vongsynha told law enforcement that Thavixay owed him money. He drove Thavixay to the store in his parents’ vehicle and waited while Thavixay went inside and purchased the television.
Vongsynha claimed that Thavixay motioned for him to come inside the store, where Thavixay told him to return the television. Vongsynha said he returned the television and kept the refund minus $70, which he gave to Thavixay.
In a separate interview, Thavixay told a different story. He claimed he’d purchased the television the previous day and decided to return it, saying he’d bought the wrong brand and that he and Vongsynha were on their way to Sioux Falls, S.D., to purchase a different television. He did concur that Vongsynha was the one who returned the item.
Thavixay then denied the counterfeit charge, stating he’d received the money he’d used to purchase the television from the proceeds of selling four ounces of marijuana to a third party during a sale made in the parking lot of Wal-Mart. Thavixay claimed he was unaware that the $20 bills were fake.
If convicted, felony-level theft by swindle carries a maximum sentence of five years in jail, a $10,000 fine or both. The counterfeiting charge carries the same maximum sentence.
Thavixay has previously been convicted of fifth-degree drug possession following a plea hearing Thursday morning. He will be formally sentenced in that case next month.

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Vongsynha

Related Topics: CRIME
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