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United Prairie Bank honored for community involvement

EDEN PRAIRIE -- The Minnesota Bankers Association (MBA) recently recognized 21 Minnesota banks for their community involvement. Banks play an important and vital role in their communities, and to honor and recognize their involvement, the MBA cre...

EDEN PRAIRIE - The Minnesota Bankers Association (MBA) recently recognized 21 Minnesota banks for their community involvement.
Banks play an important and vital role in their communities, and to honor and recognize their involvement, the MBA created the Community Champion recognition program.
United Prairie Bank is one of the 21 banks that worked with hundreds of organizations in their communities, providing funding, volunteers, materials, supplies or food for their neighbors.
Recipients of the recognition range in size from small community banks to large banks with multiple branches. Many of these banks reported over 50 percent of the bank’s employees volunteered on behalf of their bank for organizations such as the Rotary, Feed My Starving Children, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, Second Harvest Heartland, Catholic Charities, Boy Scouts, Minnesota Business Venture, Junior Achievement, United Way, Habitat for Humanity, local schools, churches or non-profits.
“This extraordinary level of volunteer participation by Minnesota banks demonstrates their deep commitment to the communities they serve,” MBA President/CEO Joe Witt said. “In addition to providing the capital that helps families and local businesses thrive, the banking industry’s record of supporting local programs is second to none. The MBA is pleased to recognize these 21 banks for their commitment to making a real difference in their local communities.”
Recipients are recognized with a certificate and recognition at the MBA Bank Day at the Capitol event in St. Paul.

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