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Vehicle plunges into ditch Thursday

WORTHINGTON -- A two-vehicle crash Thursday morning in northwest Worthington resulted in minimal injuries. According to Worthington Police Department Sgt. Tim Gaul, dispatch received a call around 9:58 a.m. to a two-vehicle crash near the interse...

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Worthington Fire Department members help an individual out of his vehicle after it crashed into a ditch south of Interstate 90 on Minnesota 266 in Worthington. (Alyssa Sobotka/The Globe)

WORTHINGTON - A two-vehicle crash Thursday morning in northwest Worthington resulted in minimal injuries.

 

According to Worthington Police Department Sgt. Tim Gaul, dispatch received a call around 9:58 a.m. to a two-vehicle crash near the intersection of Minnesota 266 and the I-90 east ramp.

 

According to the report, a driver from Grand Rapids, Mich. was traveling east on I-90 and took exit 42 in search of a gas station. At the same time, a driver from Jackson was traveling south on Minnesota 266.

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Seeing no gas station, the Grand Rapids driver tried to cross Minnesota 266 to get back on the east I-90 ramp, and the two vehicles collided. The Grand Rapid driver’s failure to yield contributed to the accident, Gaul said.

 

The Grand Rapids vehicle rolled at least twice before ending upright at the intersection’s northeast ditch. Running water from the culvert prevented the driver and his passenger from exiting their vehicle, Gaul said.

 

The driver and passenger were transported to Sanford Medical Center for what Gaul guesses to be precautionary measures. They have been released.

 

Gaul said all three individuals were wearing their seat belts.

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Agencies that responded included the Worthington Police Department, Nobles County Sheriff’s Office, Sanford Ambulance and the Worthington Fire and Rescue Department. The vehicles were towed by Mark’s Towing.

 

Related Topics: CRASHES
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