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VMC expands services

WORTHINGTON -- Some big changes have taken place at the Veterinary Medical Center (VMC) in the last week, and more are expected. Dr. Steve Dudley joined the team in 1987 and has seen the company transform over the years. "When I started we had ab...

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Steve Dudley and Angie Wietzema, manager at the VMC, pose in front of what used to hold merchandise for livestock. It will soon house more retail for pets. Kristin Kirtz/Daily Globe

WORTHINGTON - Some big changes have taken place at the Veterinary Medical Center (VMC) in the last week, and more are expected. 

Dr. Steve Dudley joined the team in 1987 and has seen the company transform over the years.
“When I started we had about five veterinarians and about 10 people,” Dudley said. “Now, we have 15 veterinarians and about 75 people who are employed through us.”
With the addition of team members and the expansion of the business, it only made sense to add a building.
Next to the new Prairie Holdings building, an even newer building in the Bioscience Park north of town - located at 1575 Bioscience Drive - is the new VMC home. This facility now holds all the large animal and livestock merchandise that was once all housed at the VMC at 600 Oxford St.
“We will expand our pet care services,” Dudley said. “We hopefully will offer more retail products like toys and food. … We’ll also have the room to potentially expand laser therapy for pets.
“We also have a chiropractor that comes down once a week, and that’s been crowded. We offer a lot of different services, but we haven’t had a lot of space to really expand that.”
Dudley said the new warehouse stores supplies such as vaccines, feed additives and different water medications.
“Anything that our livestock producers need or that can help their animals, we want to try to deliver,” Dudley said. “The warehouse facility will allow us to expand the number of products that we can bring to our customer base.”
The Oxford Street location still serves as the pet clinic. The new location is for storage, along with large animal and livestock pharmacy services.
“Most of our large animal stuff is done in the country going to the locations,” Dudley said. “But the large animal products - all the vaccines and equipment and antibiotics that people need - will now come to Bioscience Drive.”
Dudley said more changes are expected to take place within the next year or so because of new veterinary regulations.
“There’s a lot of changes going on in veterinary medicine from a regulatory standpoint,” he said. “Our ability to prescribe and how often we have to be at the farm and all those things are becoming more scrutinized. So that’s something that will be changing in the next year or year and a half.”
Visit the VMC’s website at vmcclinic.com to learn more about what services the VMS has to offer.

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