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Water rule veto does not end opposition

Opponents of the Obama administration's efforts to regulate small bodies of water and streams pledge to continue fighting.President Barack Obama vetoed a congressional resolution that would have prevented enforcement of the Waters of the U.S. pro...

Opponents of the Obama administration’s efforts to regulate small bodies of water and streams pledge to continue fighting.
President Barack Obama vetoed a congressional resolution that would have prevented enforcement of the Waters of the U.S. provision.
“We must protect the waters that are vital for the health of our communities and the success of our businesses, agriculture and energy development,” Obama said in his Tuesday veto message. “As I have noted before, too many of our waters have been left vulnerable.”
He wrote that pollution affects some previously unregulated “rivers, lakes, reservoirs and coastal waters near which most Americans live and on which they depend for their drinking water, recreation and economic development.”
Even with Obama’s veto, his rule cannot be enforced because of a court order last fall.
Opponents promise to keep up their fight, both in Congress and in the courts.
“I will continue to work with my colleagues to kill this rule once and for all while supporting the states’ efforts to litigate this matter,” U.S. Rep. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D., said.
Minnesota’s congressional delegation mostly broke along party lines on the issue, with Rep. Collin Peterson the only Democrat joining Republicans to vote against the rule.
U.S. Rep. Rick Nolan, D-Minn., said the GOP-led resolution against the Obama rule jeopardized public safety and the environment.
“The clean water rule is carefully designed to protect our lakes, rivers and drinking water and ensure that EPA requirements are applied fairly and consistently across the nation,” Nolan said.

Related Topics: ENVIRONMENT
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