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Wilder programs scheduled for region in October

WORTHINGTON -- Laura Ingalls Wilder will be in the Plum Creek Library System territory during the month of October, presenting her living history programs at a number of library locations throughout the nine-county area.

WORTHINGTON -- Laura Ingalls Wilder will be in the Plum Creek Library System territory during the month of October, presenting her living history programs at a number of library locations throughout the nine-county area.

In the highly interactive  program, Laura -- portrayed by Melanie Stringer -- relates stories of her real life experiences of life on the prairie in 1896 as told from Laura’s perspective in an unscripted interpretation of Wilder’s experiences.

 

In her “Meet Laura” program, Stringer portrays Laura a young adult, living with her husband Almanzo and their daughter Rose outskirts of the Ozark town of Mansfield, Mo., where they had been building up their farm.  Times were rough for the family and they struggled financially, yet were still able to survive.

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The program also includes a hands-on artifact display of everyday items familiar and necessary to Laura during this era. Springer, a historian who has studied American history, women’s history and Laura Ingalls Wilder for more than 20 years, encourages active participation from her audiences and welcomes questions of every sort.

Program presentations are scheduled in the region for the following times and locations:

Oct. 6 -- 7 p.m., Adrian Elementary School; Oct. 7 -- 2 p.m., Fulda City Hall; Oct. 12 -- 7 p.m., Pioneer Village, Worthington; Oct. 15 -- 10:30 a.m., Slayton Public Library; Oct. 19 -- 1 p.m., Lakefield Branch Library; Oct. 20 -- noon, Jackson County Library, Jackson; 6 p.m., Heron Lake Branch Library; Oct. 21 -- 2 p.m., Cottonwood County Historical Society, Windom; Oct. 24 -- 1:30 p.m., Westbrook-Walnut Grove School; Oct. 27 -- 6:30 p.m., Rock County Library, Luverne; Oct. 28 -- 10:30 a.m., Edgerton Public Library.

The presentations are made possible through the state’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund, which dedicates funding to preserve Minnesota’s arts and cultural heritage.

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