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Woodstock man accused of assaulting deputy

PIPESTONE -- A Woodstock man accused of assaulting a Pipestone County Deputy while incarcerated at the county jail is facing additional criminal charges in Pipestone County District Court.

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Hatton

PIPESTONE - A Woodstock man accused of assaulting a Pipestone County Deputy while incarcerated at the county jail is facing additional criminal charges in Pipestone County District Court.

Aren F. Hatton, 37, faces charges of felony fourth-degree assault of a peace officer and disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor, after allegedly hitting a deputy’s face with his forearm. A fourth-degree assault of a peace officer conviction has a maximum penalty of three years imprisonment, a $6,000 fine or both.

According to the criminal complaint, a deputy responded to the jail visiting room June 9 due to a noise disturbance. Upon contact, the deputy allegedly witnessed Hatton arguing with the individual visiting him, the complaint continues. Hatton had been a Pipestone County Jail inmate since June 6 and was later charged with fifth-degree possession of a controlled substance.

When the deputy tried to control the situation and eventually remove Hatton, Hatton became argumentative and “came at” the deputy, the complaint details. The deputy was struck in the face with Hatton’s forearm, causing a large, visible red mark on his neck, torn skin on the inside of his lip and a broken knob on his portable radio as a result.

Hatton receded when the deputy drew his taser, but later verbally threatened him as he was being handcuffed and directed back into the jail.

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Bail information was unknown before presstime Tuesday. His initial appearance is scheduled for June 26 in Pipestone District Court.

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