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Worthington Chamber to host series of political debates

WORTHINGTON -- With the Nov. 6 elections coming up, the Worthington Area Chamber of Commerce plans to host a debate for local offices on each Tuesday in October.

WORTHINGTON - With the Nov. 6 elections coming up, the Worthington Area Chamber of Commerce plans to host a debate for local offices on each Tuesday in October.

Each debate will take place at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Worthington High School band room.

The first debate - taking place Oct. 2 - will feature candidates for the District 518 School Board of Education. This year’s school board candidates are Lori Dudley, Robert Carstensen, Adam Blume, Don Brink, Mike Harberts and Tom Prins. Voters will be tasked with electing three candidates out of the group.

On Tuesday, Oct. 9, candidates for Worthington Mayor and Worthington City Council will debate. Running for mayor are Mike Kuhle, Alan Oberloh and Benjamin Weber. Larry Janssen, Rod Sankey and Chris Kielblock are running for the Ward 1 council seat, while Mike Harmon and Ryan Weber are running for the Ward 2 seat.

A debate with candidates for Nobles County Auditor-Treasurer - Joyce Jacobs and Theodore Buhner - and Recorder - Thelma Yager and Renee Schnurstein - is planned for Oct. 16.

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On Oct. 23, a debate between Minnesota House 22A candidates Rod Hamilton and Cheniqua Johnson is tentatively scheduled to take place.

The chamber is also hoping to host a debate between 1st Congressional District Candidates Dan Feehan and Jim Hagedorn by the end of the month.

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