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Worthington honors Weber for legislative work

WORTHINGTON -- The Worthington City Council on Monday recognized District 22 Sen. Bill Weber for his efforts during the 2017 legislative session. Weber, R-Luverne, was one of 32 legislators selected by the League of Minnesota Cities as a Legislat...

WORTHINGTON - The Worthington City Council on Monday recognized District 22 Sen. Bill Weber for his efforts during the 2017 legislative session.

 

Weber, R-Luverne, was one of 32 legislators selected by the League of Minnesota Cities as a Legislator of Distinction for 2017.

 

Weber authored multiple pieces of legislation supported by the League. One was a bill that provided cities with the assurance that once they improved their wastewater treatment facilities to meet new environmental standards, they will not need to rebuild until they have been able to pay off a reasonable portion of the debt they incurred.

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Weber also helped push to increase Local Government Aid, resulting in an annual increase of $15 million being including in the final budget.

 

Most importantly, Weber has long pushed to extend the Lewis & Clark water pipeline to Worthington, and it finally got funded this session.  

 

“It’s nice to have the Lewis & Clark project done, in light of the fact that as a councilman I first voted for it 21 years ago, to know that I shouldn’t have to take another vote on it,” Weber said.

 

Weber also thanked the city of Worthington for its efforts in lobbying for the League of Minnesota Cities.

 

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“I’m honored to be a part of it, honored to represent District 22, and thanks again for the support all of you have given as we’ve pursued these different projects here,” Weber said. “Worthington is always up there advocating for Minnesota cities, not just the Lewis & Clark project.”

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