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Worthington man presented award from Minnesota-Dakotas Kiwanis

WORTHINGTON -- Chad Nixon of Worthington was honored with the Minnesota-Dakotas District Citizenship Award Aug. 12, during the Minnesota-Dakotas Kiwanis District Convention in Watertown, S.D. The award was in recognition of Nixon's life-saving ef...

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Chad Nixon (left) is shown with his wife and daughters following the awards presentation. (Special to The Globe)

WORTHINGTON - Chad Nixon of Worthington was honored with the Minnesota-Dakotas District Citizenship Award Aug. 12, during the Minnesota-Dakotas Kiwanis District Convention in Watertown, S.D. The award was in recognition of Nixon’s life-saving efforts performed on a man who nearly drowned in Lake Okabena one year ago.

He was nominated for the honor by the Early Risers Kiwanis Club of Worthington.
Nixon was hosting an end-of-summer picnic and boat ride for some of his Burger King employees on Aug. 31, 2016, when he and Ricky Reum noticed a man trying to swim toward a ball on Lake Okabena. The man was struggling, and it became clear he didn’t know how to swim.

Nixon jumped in the water and pulled the man to the edge of the boat and then to shore.

A member of the Worthington Fire Department and Rescue Squad, Nixon never learned the name of the man whose life he saved.

The man didn’t appear to speak much English and “never said one word to me, but just kept patting me on the shoulder,” Nixon said. “His facial expressions said a thousand words!”
Later that week, after the story of Nixon’s heroics was reported in The Globe, the rescued man appeared at Burger King, where Nixon recognized him by the small, dark earrings he wore.
The young man told his mother at the table and they all cried. The interpreter read the newspaper to him and took a picture of them together.
The Early Risers Kiwanis Club, in its nomination letter, said it is proud of what Nixon did that August day to save a young man’s life.

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