ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Worthington man receives prison sentence follow BRDTF controlled buy

WORTHINGTON -- A Worthington man was sentenced to approximately nine years in jail after being convicted of selling cocaine in July 2012 as part of a Buffalo Ridge Drug Task Force sting.

WORTHINGTON - A Worthington man was sentenced to approximately nine years in jail after being convicted of selling cocaine in July 2012 as part of a Buffalo Ridge Drug Task Force sting.

Edward Vallejo, 43, was convicted of felony second-degree drug sale Wednesday in Nobles County District Court after selling a total of 10 grams of cocaine during two undercover buys in July 2012. He was also ordered to pay $3,106 transportation restitution to the Nobles County Sheriff’s Office and $1,400 to the BRDTF for costs incurred during the controlled buys.

Prior to sentencing, Nobles County Attorney Assistant Adam Johnson argued that Vallejo should serve the maximum sentence allowed (117 months) under the plea agreement. Citing what Johnson called a long criminal history dating back to 1992, Johnson said Vallejo has committed violent crimes spanning the gamut of drugs, sale, criminal sexual conduct and violence.

“He’s a danger to society at this point,” Johnson said.

Defense attorney Philip Elbert argued that Vallejo should receive a lesser sentence (95 months) due to what he called unusual circumstances when compared to similar cases, which included Vallejo’s success in obtaining employment and having no chemical dependency violations.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I think it’s important that the court recognize what he’s been doing since he’s been released,” Elbert argued.

Acknowledging counsel’s arguments, Fifth Judicial District Judge Gordon Moore met each attorney’s recommendations halfway.

Prior to sentencing, Vallejo told Moore that he admits to the choices he’s made in the past and takes responsibility for those actions.

“I have changed, and I am going to change,” he said. “I’m going to come out (of prison) changed.”

Moore said he appreciated Vallejo’s ownership of his actions, and hopes that he is successful while he’s incarcerated and takes advantage of the resources available to him.

“You’ve been around the block a few times, Mr. Vallejo,” Moore said. “You know where those bad choices and habits will lead you.”

Entitled to more than 1,000 days credit for time served, Vallejo has approximately two and a half years remaining to serve in a Minnesota Correctional Facility before being considered for supervised release for the remainder of his sentence.

A photo of Vallejo was not available at press time.

What To Read Next
The North Dakota Highway Patrol investigated the Wednesday, Jan. 25, crash.
Fundraising is underway to move the giant ball of twine from the Highland, Wisconsin, home of creator James Frank Kotera, who died last month at age 75, 44 years after starting the big ball.
“We see that when things happen in the coastal areas, a few years later, they start trending toward the Midwest,” said Rep. Ben Krohmer, serving his first term in the House.
“This is sensationalism at its finest, and it does not deserve to be heard in our state capitol,” Rep. Erin Healy, a Democrat and one of 10 votes against the bill in the 70-person chamber, said.