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Worthington man who called police to home faces drug charges

WORTHINGTON -- A Worthington man is facing a felony drug charge after calling police to his own residence. According to the criminal complaint, a Worthington police officer responded to a Grand Avenue residence early Sept. 20 after Brian Soules, ...

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Soules

WORTHINGTON - A Worthington man is facing a felony drug charge after calling police to his own residence.

According to the criminal complaint, a Worthington police officer responded to a Grand Avenue residence early Sept. 20 after Brian Soules, 53, reported having seen two people outside behind his garage.

The officer did not locate anyone upon arrival, the complaint continues. The officer detailed Soules as extremely talkative, having fresh sores on his face and demonstrating other behavior believed to be consistent with drug recent drug use.

Soules allowed officers to search his residence, where they allegedly found a butane torch and a ziplock-style baggie with a crystalline substance that field-tested positive for methamphetamine. Soules admitted to having smoked “a hit” the day before.

According to Soules’ criminal history record, he has a previous controlled substance conviction from August 2016.

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His conditional bail was set at $1,500 and unconditional at $10,000. He’s scheduled to make an Oct. 1 initial appearance in Nobles County District Court.

11:15 a.m. Wednesday edit: Soules' mugshot was added after being received Wednesday morning.

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