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Worthington to be featured on Pioneer's 'Compass'

APPLETON -- Rural communities that turn to art to help address issues they face will be the topic of discussion for the upcoming "Compass" public affairs program airing at 9 p.m. Thursday on Pioneer Public Television. The program will also be reb...

APPLETON - Rural communities that turn to art to help address issues they face will be the topic of discussion for the upcoming “Compass” public affairs program airing at 9 p.m. Thursday on Pioneer Public Television. The program will also be rebroadcast at 1:30 p.m. July 2 and will be available for online viewing at www.pioneer.org/compass .

“Compass” producer Laura Kay Prosser traveled to Worthington to learn from Lisa Graphenteen, chief operating officer for the Southwest Minnesota Housing Partnership, about their Partnership Art Initiative to engage the arts and cultural strategies into community planning and development work they do in the region.

Back in the Appleton studio, Pioneer's general manager, Les Heen, interviews Ashley Hanson and Andrew Gaylord of PlaceBase Productions about their strategy of highlighting the history of small towns through site-based theatre to make connections across generations and inspire hope for the future.

For the “Compass” Literature Corner, Prosser interviews author Nicole Baart of Sioux Center, Iowa about her book "Little Broken Things," about an affluent suburban family whose carefully constructed facade starts to come apart with the unexpected arrival of an endangered young girl.

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