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As others see it: ‘Gap year’ may help some

About 3.3 million students are expected to graduate from U.S. high schools this year. One of President Barack Obama's daughters is among them. Earlier this month, the White House announced Malia will not go directly to college. She is taking a so...

About 3.3 million students are expected to graduate from U.S. high schools this year. One of President Barack Obama’s daughters is among them. Earlier this month, the White House announced Malia will not go directly to college. She is taking a so-called “gap year” after graduation and will attend Harvard University in the fall of 2017. ...
About 30 percent of students who started college in the fall of 2013 did not return to any U.S. college in the fall of 2014, according to the most recent data from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. Think about that. Nearly one in three students. They didn’t transfer to a different school. They didn’t go back.
In Iowa, only about 40 percent of students who enter a four-year public college graduate in four years. Less than 70 percent graduate in six years.
The millions of Americans who start college but don’t finish may be worse off than those who never attended. Many have student loans to repay with no college degree to secure a higher paying job. They may have fallen behind their peers in obtaining work experience. Potential employers may perceive them as unable to finish what they start. Worst of all, they may perceive themselves as failures. ...
Working 40 hours a week in a minimum-wage job can do wonders to help someone understand the value of higher education. It buys extra time for their brain to develop. It may improve their chances of staying in school and earning a degree. And isn’t that the point?
Quad-City Times

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