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As others see it: Meat as villain -- we're not buying

Imagine telling cowboys of yesterday that red meat is potentially deadly and that the methane gas released from their herd will lead to earthly ruination. As unbelievable as that may have been a century ago, that's where we're at today. We hear g...

Imagine telling cowboys of yesterday that red meat is potentially deadly and that the methane gas released from their herd will lead to earthly ruination.
As unbelievable as that may have been a century ago, that’s where we’re at today. We hear groups loudly proclaiming that eating red meat will shorten our lives. In the long run, maybe so, but since we know these medical outlooks tend to change over time, we are opting to withhold an opinion on it one way or another. ...
And now we know that a so-called tax may someday be applied to red meat. ...
As noted in a Herald editorial last week, sin taxes aren’t necessarily fair taxes. They prey upon the vices - or habits - of consumers. It’s true that we tax cigarettes because of their adverse effect on the health of smokers and those around them. Same goes for the overuse of alcohol.
But our concern is this: We suspect much of the call for a meat tax comes from animal-rights proponents, and we similarly suspect their call for taxation stems not from worries about the environment, but simply in an effort to foil an industry. That’s no reason to institute a new tax on a noble industry.
And what happens when the world stops eating red meat? Vegetable consumption grows, of course, and so does the land’s thirst for water, as well as need for more fuel to plant, cultivate and harvest these additional crops.
We’re tired of people creating controversy for the farmers and ranchers who toil to feed the world. ...

Related Topics: AGRICULTUREENVIRONMENT
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