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Column: Hospice doesn't mean being homebound, bedbound

By Jennifer Black, Compassionate Care Hospice Welcome to the ninth in a series of articles that exposes common myths and misconceptions surrounding hospice care. The goal of this series is to set the record straight by addressing these myths with...

By Jennifer Black, Compassionate Care Hospice

Welcome to the ninth in a series of articles that exposes common myths and misconceptions surrounding hospice care. The goal of this series is to set the record straight by addressing these myths with honesty and integrity. Our hope is that the education provided here will lead to families and caregivers having the necessary information to engage in open conversations with their loved ones about end of life care.

 

Myth # 9: “I must be homebound and/or bedbound to begin hospice” and “hospice will make me move.”

 

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Hospice does not require patients to be homebound or bedbound in order to receive services. Hospice is life affirming and encourages patients to live as fully and actively as health allows. Many hospice patients continue to participate in activities or hobbies such as gardening, going to church, fishing, camping, traveling and woodworking to name a few. Some patients have a bucket list or a final wish. Hospice will assist that patient in fulfilling that wish if possible.  

 

Hospice serves patients in many different locations that are considered home. This could be a private residence, assisted living, adjustment training center or a skilled nursing facility. If the goal of a hospice patient is to remain at home, then the hospice Social Worker and RN Case Manager will assist in getting the necessary resources in place to assist in attaining that goal. There are some patients who do not wish to remain at home. Once that is determined, the hospice social worker will assist the patient in securing placement at the facility of his/her choice.

 

Hospice is there to help patients remain comfortable, alert and able to participate in life as fully as possible by providing holistic, compassionate care to patients and families. Dying is recognized by hospice as a normal part of the living process. It is the hope of hospice to enhance quality of life so patients can continue to have opportunities to grow as an individual in the search for meaning, peace and acceptance.

 

Come back next month for Myth #10: “Hospice is only for people who have cancer.”

 

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Email your questions, comments or suggestions to jennifer.black@cchnet.net  or call 1-877-372-7003.

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