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A few slippery roads presents temptation to fall into chronic complaining.
"The inner peace that Jesus promised the faithful pulled us away from our fears of scarcity, a root motivator initiating our domination instinct over others, and helped us to realize that our neighbors were actually part of the same great big body of believers."
"The culture of agriculture in the holiday season and throughout the year needs preserving and to continue into our kids and future generations," Katie Pinke says.
"As you walk through the halls of the Learning Center, you will see students collaborating with teachers and students collaborating with other students."

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Matthew 25 reminds us that we encounter Christ in the neighbors around us, especially people who are experiencing needs.
Holiday expectations of unalloyed happiness can be pretty unrealistic.
Ann Bailey explains why she's thankful for agriculture in professional and personal life.
"After a couple of years of celebrating apart because of the pandemic, and also for having just lived through another rancorous national election, we all could use the joy and hope and anticipation that is promised us in Christmas, in the birth of a mighty little king born in a manger."
Katie Pinke looks at the positive impact of 4-H on youth.
"Six Nations speak of a principle called the seventh-generation teaching, where leaders are instructed to 'consider the impact of their decisions on the seventh generation from now.' That’s a profound teaching, and a stark contrast to America’s current political promises, four-year terms, special interest lobbying and decisions based on quarterly profits. How about if we thought long term?"

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When my tour around the classroom was nearing its end, Dave showed me the best thing yet — a free root beer dispenser. Through the clear plastic jug I saw a familiar root beer colored liquid topped with an appetizing foam head. I was over-awed and it looked very tempting.
The antidote you need comes from the Bible’s most morbid book: Ecclesiastes. This is the short Old Testament book that concludes that all human emotion, activity and ambition results in hevel, an awesome Hebrew word that means fog, mist, vanity and meaninglessness.
"It's pretty easy to forget that the rest of us can stay inside and not deal with these things only because there are people who willingly go outside every day and do the work. When you pull a package of hamburger or a steak from your freezer, remember the ones who raised the cattle and say a little prayer for their safety and well-being."

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