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Editorial: It's time to get moving on bonding

It's not unusual for meaningful law-making work in St. Paul to be completed at the last minute, and House Republicans are certainly doing their part to try and make sure the same holds true this year.Even though this represents a traditional bond...

It’s not unusual for meaningful law-making work in St. Paul to be completed at the last minute, and House Republicans are certainly doing their part to try and make sure the same holds true this year.
Even though this represents a traditional bonding year for the Minnesota Legislature, lawmakers seem about as far away from a deal as possible. That’s because Gov. Mark Dayton has proposed a $1.4 billion bonding bill, the DFLers in the Senate a $1.5 billion bill and House Republicans (drum roll, please) absolutely nothing specific.
Whether or not plans offered by Dayton and Senate Democrats are too spendy is almost beside the point. It’s not at all surprising that Republicans want a lower figure, and House Leader Kurt Daudt and others in his party have said they’ll put forth a $600 million proposal. That’s fine, but the GOP has yet to release a bonding package with any particulars, making any negotiations toward some sort of a reasonable and bipartisan compromise an impossibility.
We also couldn’t help but notice that in casting a “no” against the Senate DFL plan, District 22 Sen. Bill Weber, R-Luverne, voted against $2.2 million for a Windom regional emergency services facility and $11.5 million to complete the Lewis and Clark Regional Water System. Weber obviously thinks the DFL bonding figure is too high, but would his own party fund both of those projects in its counterproposal? We’d love to know.
The Legislature’s adjournment date is May 23; 11 short days away. It’s past time to get moving.

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