ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Letter: Know your rights when it comes to PSEO

By Joe Nathan, St. Paul Minnesota's 2017 legislature expanded Post Secondary Enrollment Option (PSEO) opportunities for students, in part because of problems in Fulda and some other Minnesota school districts. The law now says that districts must...

We are part of The Trust Project.

By Joe Nathan, St. Paul

Minnesota's 2017 legislature expanded Post Secondary Enrollment Option (PSEO) opportunities for students, in part because of problems in Fulda and some other Minnesota school districts. The law now says that districts must provide access to computer hardware, software and space so that students can participate in PSEO courses online.

 

This legislative decision is important for many decisions, including the recent court case in which a judge decided that Fulda district restrictions "violated no law." Your paper discussed that case in an article in the July 29 edition.

 

ADVERTISEMENT

Fulda and all other districts, must provide the kind of access that led to the lawsuit.  Here is a portion of a note recently sent by the Minnesota Commissioner of Education, Brenda Cassellius, to all Minnesota district superintendents and charter public school directors:

 

"Access to building and technology for PSEO students, subdivision 11a: A school district must allow a student enrolled in a PSEO course to remain at the school site during regular school hours. Districts must adopt a policy that provides PSEO students reasonable access during regular school hours to a computer and other technology resources that the student needs to complete coursework for a PSEO course."

 

Since 1985, PSEO and other forms of dual credit have given Minnesota students important opportunities to challenge themselves. These laws also have helped families save millions of dollars in college costs. It's important for families to know their rights.

 

Thanks to the Worthington Globe and the Commissioner of Education for sharing this information with the public.

 

ADVERTISEMENT

Editor's note: The writer is a former Minnesota public school teacher, administrator and PTA president. He’s now director at the Center for School Change.

Related Topics: EDUCATION
What To Read Next
We’ve jump-started projects across our state to replace outdated utilities systems, expand broadband, build electric vehicle charging stations, and rebuild roads and bridges.