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Letter: Space problem represents a chance to grow

By Andrea Magana, Worthington I am the oldest of soon-to-be eight children. In our house we have a high schooler, a middle schooler, two elementary kids, a preschooler, a 2-year-old and a soon-to-be newborn. I was privileged enough to grow up in ...

By Andrea Magana, Worthington

I am the oldest of soon-to-be eight children. In our house we have a high schooler, a middle schooler, two elementary kids, a preschooler, a 2-year-old and a soon-to-be newborn. I was privileged enough to grow up in a community where even though I was an immigrant, a female and a Latina, a plethora of academic opportunities were available to me, like the opportunities that led me to graduate two years early from college and saving over $90,000 in college debt.  

 

Today, there’s a growing academic problem in Worthington. Worthington is getting bigger. This means that along with more adults, there are more youth in our community. Our public schools have become overcrowded because Worthington is growing and prospering. This is making resources and academic opportunities difficult for students to receive - especially students of color, students with disabilities and students who require extra academic help from our teachers and paras. I believe that our siblings, our nephews, our grandchildren and our youth deserve a high-quality education with adequate space and resources. Only then will District 518 be able to create life-changing academic opportunities and experiences like mine.

 

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I am also the founder of Humans of Worthington. I've been honored to interview people from all walks of life. A common value I’ve taken from my interviews is the importance of continuous investment in our youth, in our education system and in our community. Worthington, we need to invest in our youth because our community is going to continue to prosper and grow whether we let it or not. This space problem in our public schools is an opportunity for growth. Let’s be prepared for more growth, not stunt it. Vote YES on Feb. 13.

Related Topics: EDUCATION
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