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What came first? The chicken or the egg?

WORTHINGTON -- First of all, I never lived on a farm, nor did any of my relatives. It was the first week of school of my senior year, in the fall of 1946, and I was sitting in a physics class. I was completely baffled by what the teacher was sayi...

WORTHINGTON - First of all, I never lived on a farm, nor did any of my relatives. It was the first week of school of my senior year, in the fall of 1946, and I was sitting in a physics class. I was completely baffled by what the teacher was saying, and I knew I had to change classes fast before I’d fail this one to make sure I graduated from high school. The only class with any room left for me to switch to was Girls Agriculture. Well, OK, I can try this, but will the farm girls accept me? Well, they were very friendly to me even though I was so naive about animals and farms!

 

It was unusual to have Girls Ag in 1946. Only a few high schools in Minnesota offered this class. Our ag class studied what women would do on the farm. We learned about caring for the lawn around the house, tending vegetable and flower gardens, feeding the chickens and gathering eggs. Now, in 2017, students at WHS can have a wonderful choice of 11 electives regarding agriculture. There are classes such as Agri-Business, Companion Animals, and Landscape and Design.

 

One day my ag teacher, Mr. Hoberg, brought in a huge white chicken. “Nancy, what color eggs will this chicken lay? White or brown?” Of course it will lay white eggs; it is a white bird. All the girls started laughing. It will not lay eggs, it is a rooster!

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One of my fellow students invited me to her farm for a birthday party. After playing games and eating cake, we were invited to the barn to see the bulls. Yes, this was a bull farm. Off we went to the big red barn that was built right into the side of the hill we were walking on. When you entered the barn, you were then on the second level overlooking the bull pens. We stood against a railing and looked down at these massive animals. Their low, mooing roar was a sound I had never heard. I decided then and there, I would not marry a farmer. The work! The chores!

 

Many of you should remember from years ago the WHS Ag teacher John Wright. One day he helped an insurance salesman from the cities get to several farms. As they drove down the gravel road to one of the farms, they saw that a piglet had gotten loose and was coming down the road. “Look,” said the salesman, “this farm has a ‘watch pig!’”

Related Topics: AGRICULTURE
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