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KRISTI NOEM

Two new advertisements in the span of a week and a ratcheting up of attacks focused on record mean it just might be election season.
The appeal, which sought a ruling undermining the power of the National Park Service to issue permits as it sees fit, was dismissed by the Eighth Circuit of the United States Court of Appeals on July 27.
Although the surplus partially stemmed from a strengthening of the state's economy, the aftershocks of federal stimulus, sales tax structure and fluctuation in social service spending also played a part.
Abortion-related legislation planned for the special session will instead be introduced during the regular legislative session early next year, the governor said in a joint statement released Friday afternoon.

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In a public back-and-forth announcing the debate, scheduled for Sept. 30 in Rapid City, the gubernatorial candidates previewed some lines of attack to watch when they meet on stage.
Most laws out of the 2022 legislative session earlier this year took effect Friday, July 1. Among the notable changes are a waiving of concealed carry fees, a much discussed telemedicine abortion ban and new regulations over "divisive concepts" in mandatory collegiate trainings.
For the fifth year, Agweek reporter Mikkel Pates reprises his Flags On Farms feature for Independence Day, featuring flags of the United States on farms and agribusinesses in the region. This year, our featured vignette is from a former grain elevator at Andover, South Dakota, with a 30-by-60 foot U.S. flag painted on it.
With in-state abortions now illegal in most circumstances, few options remain for South Dakotans looking to terminate a pregnancy. During an upcoming special legislative session, lawmakers and lobbyists have indicated a desire to restrict out-of-state abortions, too.
The South Dakota governor has released her autobiography, “Not My First Rodeo: Lessons from the Heartland."
Smoke bombs and crowd control tactics were employed as protesters took to the streets in an unpermitted protest that police say challenged their ability to keep everyone safe.

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With Clay County State’s Attorney Alexis Tracy by his side, Vargo successfully argued against Ravnsborg and his counsel, Sioux Falls attorney Mike Butler and impeachment defense expert Ross Garber.
Gov. Noem and Sen. Thune, both pro-life Republicans, had different messages, with one focusing on abortion and the other focusing on judicial independence.
“A cover-up is what this is. It’s as bad as the crime," said Rep. Tim Goodwin, R-Rapid City, referring to a House committee that recommended against impeaching Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg. State officials will answer lawmaker questions about the Ravnsborg investigation on Wednesday, just six days before the full House consider impeachment.

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