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Despite high water, there's still great fishing at Lake of the Woods

Lake of the Woods is considered one of the best walleye fisheries in North America and there’s a good reason for that.

Northland Outdoors Podcast Brightspot
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In this episode of the Northland Outdoors Podcast, Joe Henry, executive director of Lake of the Woods Tourism who earlier this year earned “Tourism Professional of the Year” in Minnesota, joins host Chad Koel to discuss access issues, flooding, COVID-19 protocols at the border, and of course, fishing on Lake of the Woods.

Lake of the Woods is considered one of the best walleye fisheries in North America and there’s a good reason for that, Henry said. “The thing about Lake of the Woods is that truly, we do catch fish 12 months a year on Lake of the Woods.”

Henry breaks down COVID protocols for access to Canada and says using the ArriveCAN app before your trip can help expedite you at the border crossing.

Time stamps:

  • Open / Introduction
  • 2:10 / Joe Henry talks about the lake, the walleye slot limit and the water system
  • 11:20 / Reasons for the high water
  • 14:00 / Quality fishing, guides, charter boats
  • 17:36 / How are people accessing the Northwest Angle and Canada
  • 23:12 / How to fish Ontario waters
  • 24:40 / How COVID has changed LOW resorts, businesses
  • 28:20 / What’s coming up in LOW

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