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The Drill: JO volleyball coach Haley Unke enjoys working with kids

WORTHINGTON -- When Haley Unke was a young girl growing up in Cottonwood, she was inspired by her older brother Jamie, who was an outstanding basketball player. Haley looked up to him and went to every one of his high school games.

Haley Unke web 04 03 19.jpg
Unke (left)

WORTHINGTON -- When Haley Unke was a young girl growing up in Cottonwood, she was inspired by her older brother Jamie, who was an outstanding basketball player. Haley looked up to him and went to every one of his high school games.

But, Haley recalls, when Jamie tried to dispense helpful sports information to her, she wasn’t always interested. She wanted to figure things out for herself.

“I wish I would’ve taken his help at the time,” Haley said.

Now a freshman at Minnesota West Community and Technical College participating in basketball and volleyball, some might find it ironic that Haley Unke passed on her brother’s aid when she could have benefitted from it. It’s probably even more ironic that Unke is more than willing to share her own sports knowledge with younger players.

Unke is working this spring as a local coach for two Junior Olympic volleyball teams -- one of them a team of 12-year-olds, and the other a team of 18-year olds. It’s a natural fit for someone like her, who loves kids and who loves volleyball, too.

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The Globe identified Unke as a good Drill candidate recently, so we found her at the Worthington Area YMCA dispensing valuable information to her 12-year-olds. You can see the video online at www.dglobe.com . Here’s a sample of the interview:

QUESTION: What are some of the most important things you’re trying to teach your Junior Olympic recruits?

ANSWER: “The most important thing I’d like to teach my girls as athletes is the love of the sport. If you don’t love the sport, you’re not going to have the effort, you’re not going to have the hustle. Make friends, enjoy the sport, enjoy it while you’re still a young age.”

QUESTION: What, in your estimation, is the most valuable advice you have received in your athletic career?

ANSWER: “The most valuable lesson I’ve received as an athlete from my coach would be to hustle and give it your all. If you’re not athletic, that’s fine. But if you’re giving hustle and you’re giving your effort and you’re loving the game, you’re a good asset.”

QUESTION: Tell us about some of your interests outside of sports.

ANSWER: “Outside of sports, I love children. I adore them. I baby-sit. I baby-sat since I was 14 years old. I do child-watch at the YMCA, and I study child development at Minnesota West. Once I graduate from the child development program, I’m thinking about doing occupational therapy as well. If I don’t take that path, I would love to open my own daycare in the future.”

Doug Wolter joined the Worthington Globe in December of 1983 as a sports reporter. He later became sports editor, and then news editor and managing editor. In 2006 he moved to Mankato with his wife, Sandy, and served as an editor at the Mankato Free Press. In 2013 he and Sandy returned to Worthington to take up the job of sports editor at The Globe, and they have been in Worthington since.

Doug can be reached at dwolter@dglobe.com.
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