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CATTLE

We do so many things on farms and ranches that could end badly. And we do them as a matter of course, without thinking overly much about what could happen if things went wrong.
Terry Ellingson's latest musical endeavor is competing in the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association National Anthem singing contest, where he has been named one of four finalists.
A group of cattle producers has banded together as 6 in 1 Meats to ensure that they can get meat federally-inspected to sell directly to consumers.
Napoleon, North Dakota, cattle buyer Brian Gader faces numerous legal challenges, including a theft charge in a cattle deal, has lost his license to purchase cattle and is accused of failing to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in some cases. With debts in the millions, Gader, 65, says he is "working on" his issues.

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Bryan Eden says Eden Farms of Alpena, S.D., has been taking counter-moves to make sure his cattle herd in east-central South Dakota has sufficient feed in the drought of 2021.
Selling off cattle isn't just reducing inventory and it isn't just a business decision. By selling off good cows, ranchers often are selling their work and planning, and they can't just buy new cows to replace the old.
Iowa State University Extension Beef Specialist Beth Doran offers tips to cow-calf producers.
Over eighty people attended the North Dakota Grazing Coalition's summer tour in Ellendale, North Dakota.
Cattle producers are forced to make grueling decisions, as they navigate one of the worst drought in recent history.
Kevin and Carol Fritel who farm and have a cow-calf operation east of Rugby, N.D., near the town of Knox. They remember how their first year farming on their own was the great drought of 1988 and how this one feels worse, as they have hay to make it only through mid-July. They are weighing whether to sell their cattle herd, and whether to pull the trigger before others make the same move and flood the market. They won’t replant crops when they couldn’t get the first planting established.

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Duwayne and Jennifer started out in 2007 farming row crops and hay. But a move to incorporate cattle in 2013 transformed the operation, which now primarily raises cattle for meat to sell to local consumers.
Meat and animal agriculture keep getting targeted by environmentalists and animal rights activists. But those people are forgetting about a lot of points in their effort to improve the world.
Olsen Custom Farms of Hendricks, Minn., has constructed a 14-acre site for making “humus compost” from the farm’s 3,500-head confinement beef custom feedlot near Toronto, S.D. The idea is to improve crop yields yields while replacing synthetic fertilizers, all while reducing a carbon footprint. The company believes it will be smart to get ahead of federal policies that likely will influence farm nutrient practices.

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