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CROPS

Sessions will run from 9 to 10 a.m. Wednesdays from Jan. 5 through March 30.
Webinars set to begin Jan. 5
Buckthorn control is difficult because it does not respond to multiple control methods.
Drought was the main reason U.S. canola yields were dramatically lower than last year.

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Latest Headlines
SB&B, a Casselton, North Dakota, agricultural export business which produces, processes and markets non-GMO soybeans, for a year has been sitting on more product than is typical because of a transportation backlog that’s resulted from the coronavirus pandemic. They are among the ag export companies being crippled by the lack of available ocean ships to move U.S. farm products to global markets. Ag exporters are enlisting the help of the federal governments and trade group to try to breakup that backlog
Farmer Paul R. Anderson of Coleharbor, North Dakota, is jumping back into his “.007 Project,” — irrigating from the Garrison Diversion Project’s McClusky Canal. Anderson is convinced that an investment into a variable-rate system is wise considering a multi-year drought trend and will help his family in future generations.
Due to the drought that has plagued the region, many producers braced themselves for devastating yields. But some found themselves pleasantly surprised by their small grain yields.
Bill Weber, land appraiser at Luverne, Minn., says a good crop in areas that got rain, combined with grain prices that have risen because of drought in the region, has increased land values to near their peak levels a few years ago.
A small organic farm family near Le Sueur, Minnesota, and a larger, non-GMO farmer near Kasson, Minnesota, are among those hit hard by the Pipeline Foods bankruptcy, which sent shockwaves through the region’s organic markets. The company is asking the courts to let them sell inventory grain to pay off the secured creditors, not the farmers who deliver it. The case leaves farmers wondering whether the state does enough to protect farmers and verify the financial soundness of grain traders.
Mobile Recon Systems LLC, originally from Lexington, Kentucky, a year ago moved to Grand Forks, North Dakota, and has launched a study to learn how their heavy-lift drones can seed cover crops.

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With the drought persisting, barley growers are anticipating a much earlier harvest season with overall crop quality weighing heavily on the minds of farmers and the beer brewing industry.
University of Minnesota Extension specialists spent the day on July 8 demonstrating trials at its plot in Rochester.
Agronomist Jason Hanson of Rock and Roll Agronomy LLC, Webster, N.D., explains at a field near Leeds, N.D., the impact of late freezes and drought in northern and central North Dakota. He says farmers face the dilemma of deciding whether to replant when there is no forecast for rain.

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