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Thomas Shephard's favorite part of harvest is the people he does it alongside as there are a lot of jobs to do and the people who he works with are the ones who get it done.
A Halstad, Minnesota, family has created a business of producing early-generation potato seed for potato seed producers. The business is a two-generation effort, with numerous employees here on H-2A visas.
A desire for the rural lifestyle and the opportunity to carry on the family farming legacy were two of the major reasons that influenced Nick Hagen’s decision to farm.
The state of Minnesota has launched an advertising campaign designed to inform livestock producers of the dangers of purchasing sunflower screenings, non-certified hay and other feeds from out-of-state, including North Dakota, because of the Palmer amaranth threat. State officials say the concerns are particularly strong at the Red River border between Minnesota and North Dakota, where several counties have Palmer amaranth infestations. The danger is particularly acute for the sugarbeet crop, which has few chemical tools to fight it.
Event planned at Southwest Research and Outreach Center.
Former Minnesota Congressman Collin Peterson has turned his attention to creating the Midwest Council on Agriculture, a seven state organization of leaders in agriculture, to discuss policy and influence legislation, like the upcoming farm bill negotiations.

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The $400 million North Dakota Soybean Processors plant at Casselton, North Dakota, is expected to crush 42.5 million bushels of soybeans in the first year and is a joint venture between the Minnesota Soybean Processors and Louisiana-based CGB Enterprises.
Father-son duo Tom and Scott Perlick manage the farming and distilling sides of their business in northern Wisconsin.
A legislative field event at Albert Lea Seed on July 26 highlighted the work that’s been done in the past decade by more than 50 researchers of the University of Minnesota’s Forever Green Initiative.

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