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WATER QUALITY

Known as “forever chemicals” for their persistence in the environment, PFAS have been popular with manufacturers for decades and can be found in everything from nonstick cookware coating to fire-extinguishing foam. Higher levels of exposure to PFAS have been linked to increased cancer risk, developmental delays in children, damage to organs such as the liver and thyroid, increased cholesterol levels and reduced immune functions, especially among young children.
Lowell Deede, a retired wildlife biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Office, began volunteering for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) in 2015, collecting water samples and measuring water clarity.
Testing will be done May through September.
Voluntary program fit Cottonwood County farmer’s goals of retiring and permanently protecting marginal cropland, creating a haven for wildlife.

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Latest Headlines
PFAS are a group of more than 5,000 chemicals used in products such as nonstick cookware, fast food wrappers, pizza boxes and cosmetics such as eyeliner and foundation. Increasing evidence suggests they are harmful to humans and the environment.
Minnesota health department and pollution control officials estimate the state will need to spend $12.5 billion over the next 20 years to keep up with waste and drinking water needs.
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, also known as PFAS, are a group of chemicals used in products like nonstick cookware, fast food wrappers and cosmetics, but increasing evidence suggests they are harmful to humans and the environment.
A chemical called 6PPD has been used in tires for decades to protect them from oxidation, essentially keeping the rubber from cracking and crumbling. But when exposed to oxygen and ozone in the environment, that tire protecting chemical transforms into another, called 6PPD-quinone, and that's what researchers in Washington found is highly toxic to the salmon.
The court will consider what test courts should use to determine what constitutes "waters of the United States" under the landmark 1972 Clean Water Act, the answer to which determines whether the property is subject to oversight.
The MDA has also made changes to the Fall Nitrogen Fertilizer Application Restrictions map.

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More than 80% of the watershed that makes up the headwaters of the Minnesota River fails to meet water quality standards.
The Health Department estimated the cost of removing all lead pipes and plumbing fixtures in Minnesota would be $1.5 billion to $4.12 billion over 20 years.
City of Hoffman hired a mechanical harvester to bale weeds on Elk Lake.

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